Filtering by Tag: management

Cooperation Wins. Again.

The ancient traditions are starting to penetrate the corporate organization, and with good reason. 

I'm starting to see calls for longer-term vision, rather than fighting quarter to quarter for that elusive edge over the competition and a continually tighter profit margin. I 'liked' a recent blog post on giving up on the endless march towards greater productivity—and I can't even find it now due to information overwhelm. 

Long-Term Thinking

In their recently released book The Alliance, the authors (one of them co-founder of Linkedin, Reid Hoffman) note, "A business without long-term thinking is a business that's unable to invest in the future." They encourage us to "think of employment as an alliance: a mutually beneficial deal" so that companies and people thrive together.

In fact, Darwin is well-known for the meme 'survival of the fittest' but "evolutionary theorist Peter Kropotkin pointed out in his landmark 1902 book Mutual Aid, evolution is driven by cooperation as well as by competition." If you read the book, you'll find that Darwin spends more time on this element of social behavior than competition.

I believe this thought of mutual caring, compassion, and commitment as an access to success is not so new. 

Communities have been operating this way tacitly since the beginning.

So what's the message? Cooperation wins. Again.

 

Matthew Koren unleashes the leadership potential in your people so teams can thrive. He is based out of Portland, OR. To learn more about his programs, click here. To receive great, useful content each month, sign up for his email list here. To discuss how Matt can support you, your organization, and teams, contact him today! 

 

How to get your people to express your brand

Yesterday I walked by a man downtown that, I swear, said the exact words "My needs as a human being were not being met." I'll spare you the details of his tirade, but he went on to describe an unfortunate circumstance in his organization. I was just passing by, but it made me a little depressed.

Having worked with top level executives, I know that they usually value two things above all else in their organization: their BRAND, and their PEOPLE.

So if people are such a top priority, why are they less than valued in our organizations? The #1 reason people leave their job is that they do not feel appreciated (U.S. Department of Labor). 

"Recognition is an important psychological need." says Gallup Organization's "State of the American Workplace Report". "Employees who know that they will receive recognition for acting on a brand promise will have a strong incentive to do so."

It's time for leaders to do something about this sad state of affairs. If you don't have enough time to treat your people like people, then don't expect them to stick around for long, let alone stick to your brand promises.

Appreciate your people

That's an active verb, not a passive one. Here are a few ways to show your appreciation, pulled from Connect, a booklet about how to create the culture of appreciation in your organization:

  1. Handwritten notes—Leave a note of appreciation for colleagues you feel are deserving of praise. This can be done anytime, anywhere, and can be anonymous.
  2. The Tribute Wall—Hang a large bulletin board in a conspicuous location. Colleagues are free to add notes which highlight what another colleague has contributed, specifying how she has been especially helpful to the author of the said note.
  3. Marvelous Mentor—After a new employee has begun, ask them who mentored them the most. Have them give a short speech to the mentor along with a lightbulb or candle representing how they lit up their way.

Matthew Koren unleashes the leadership potential in your people so teams can thrive. He is based out of Portland, OR. To learn more about his programs, click here. To receive great, useful content each month, sign up for his email list here. To discuss how Matt can support you, your organization, and teams, contact him today! 

Power + Authenticity = Accountability

I've been working on a new formula.

No, not like a baby formula for grown-ups (although there's more and more talk of babies around my household recently)! That would be a protein shake. Add blueberries, they're good for you.

By formula I mean, something easy to remember that adds a valuable tool to your leadership toolkit.

As always, I get the best inspirations from the people I know the best—my coaching clients!

Here's the draft version:

Power + Authenticity = Accountability

By power, I mean personal power—the power of your word, the power of your results, the power of your impact on others.

By authenticity, I mean truth—are you being who you really are?

By accountability, I mean being responsible for producing powerful results in alignment with purpose.

I know, that's a bit of a jump, but in the next few posts, I'll go into more detail on the dynamics of this formula—how it's constructed, how it works in various contexts, and what it means for today's dynamic, innovative leaders.

Comment below to let me know what you think!

What makes a leader?

Call me a dork, but I love researching noteworthy leadership information that I can translate to the lay person in a meaningful, actionable way.

My recent search, however, raised more questions than it answered. I guess that's appropriate since leadership as a research topic only became popular about 40 years ago. There are still many unanswered questions about what leadership is (i.e. a set of actions, an innate trait, and mental perspective?) and what it affects (i.e. role, influence, productivity, etc.)

What do you think makes a leader?

One of the most important questions, I feel, in the leadership research is the impact of emotional intelligence on the performance of leaders. We were just beginning to the ask this sort of question seriously about 15 years ago (Brown et al. 2005, Boyatzis et al. 2002). Now whole research teams are organized to answer the question of how emotion plays a part in our leadership performance (see Richard Boyatzis' work as an example).

The inquiry is drawing interesting connections, baffling synchronicities, and uncovering the hidden patterns that communicate 'leader'.

What do you think makes a good leader? And what traits do you think a powerful and effective leader should have? Inquiring minds want to know, please leave your comments below or share with me on LinkedIn.

Matthew Koren is a team management and leadership consultant and executive coach based out of Portland, OR. To learn more and receive great, useful content each month, sign up for my email list here.

Bibliography:

1. F. William Brown, and Dan Moshavi, "Transformational Leadership and Emotional Intelligence: A Potential Pathway for an Increased Understanding of Interpersonal Influence," Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26, no. 7 (2005): 867-871, http://www.jstor.org/stable/4093959 (accessed January 13, 2014).

2. Richard E. Boyatzis, Elizabeth C. Stubbs, and Scott N. Taylor, "Learning Cognitive and Emotional Intelligence Competencies Through Graduate Management Education," Academy of Management Learning & Education, 1, no. 2 (2002): 150-162, http://amle.aom.org/content/1/2/150.short (accessed January 13, 2014).

Hello World. Let’s Do This!

I often ask myself,  “Who do I want to be?” It’s been on my mind for a while. Just like you, I’ve gone through many options: lifeguard, day camp coordinator, yoga teacher, that call center guy, entrepreneur, sales guy, manager, coach, consultant, etc. I even traveled the world and back. You’d think something would stick!?

Hint: what you think you’re looking for is typically no further than your own backyard. In my case, it was nestled securely inside my heart between fear of success and self-consciousness.

Who Do You Want To Be?

I always wanted to be a computer programmer because I loved strategy games (that was after I decided being an astronaut would require too much math.) Then, I thought being a psychologist was the closest major in college to what I wanted to do. I wanted to figure people out and help them, and unlike astronauts, I didn’t need to take lots of math to be a psychologist =  Bonus!  

However, psychologist wasn’t my true calling but I learned that I love working with people and helping them make sense of what seems to be a crazy new world. This new world is a wonderful place to play, thrive, and live your dreams, but we often forget how powerful we are due to so much information coming at us. I’m here to help you sort through it all. My passion is your passion: creating a great life and feeling good every.single.day. Yes, it’s totally possible.

Today I’m announcing it to the world, to you, and here it is:

Over the next few weeks on this website you’ll see my thoughts and videos on topics related to my new work. I’ve worked with over 30 corporate clients and many more individuals doing team management and leadership development, and after six years being in the thick of it myself and with my clients, I realize I have the gifts necessary to deliver increased profitability and employee engagement which help executives develop their unique leadership style, and the high-performing, globally distributed, culturally competent teams they need to support them.

I hope you’ll get inspired, share my content, and enjoy the ride. Of course, let me know what you think by emailing me at matt@matthewkoren.com. I’ll be in touch again soon!

Matthew Koren is a team management and leadership consultant and executive coach based out of Portland, OR. To learn more and receive great, useful content each month, sign up for my email list here.