Filtering by Tag: team building

Cooperation Wins. Again.

The ancient traditions are starting to penetrate the corporate organization, and with good reason. 

I'm starting to see calls for longer-term vision, rather than fighting quarter to quarter for that elusive edge over the competition and a continually tighter profit margin. I 'liked' a recent blog post on giving up on the endless march towards greater productivity—and I can't even find it now due to information overwhelm. 

Long-Term Thinking

In their recently released book The Alliance, the authors (one of them co-founder of Linkedin, Reid Hoffman) note, "A business without long-term thinking is a business that's unable to invest in the future." They encourage us to "think of employment as an alliance: a mutually beneficial deal" so that companies and people thrive together.

In fact, Darwin is well-known for the meme 'survival of the fittest' but "evolutionary theorist Peter Kropotkin pointed out in his landmark 1902 book Mutual Aid, evolution is driven by cooperation as well as by competition." If you read the book, you'll find that Darwin spends more time on this element of social behavior than competition.

I believe this thought of mutual caring, compassion, and commitment as an access to success is not so new. 

Communities have been operating this way tacitly since the beginning.

So what's the message? Cooperation wins. Again.

 

Matthew Koren unleashes the leadership potential in your people so teams can thrive. He is based out of Portland, OR. To learn more about his programs, click here. To receive great, useful content each month, sign up for his email list here. To discuss how Matt can support you, your organization, and teams, contact him today! 

 

How to get your people to express your brand

Yesterday I walked by a man downtown that, I swear, said the exact words "My needs as a human being were not being met." I'll spare you the details of his tirade, but he went on to describe an unfortunate circumstance in his organization. I was just passing by, but it made me a little depressed.

Having worked with top level executives, I know that they usually value two things above all else in their organization: their BRAND, and their PEOPLE.

So if people are such a top priority, why are they less than valued in our organizations? The #1 reason people leave their job is that they do not feel appreciated (U.S. Department of Labor). 

"Recognition is an important psychological need." says Gallup Organization's "State of the American Workplace Report". "Employees who know that they will receive recognition for acting on a brand promise will have a strong incentive to do so."

It's time for leaders to do something about this sad state of affairs. If you don't have enough time to treat your people like people, then don't expect them to stick around for long, let alone stick to your brand promises.

Appreciate your people

That's an active verb, not a passive one. Here are a few ways to show your appreciation, pulled from Connect, a booklet about how to create the culture of appreciation in your organization:

  1. Handwritten notes—Leave a note of appreciation for colleagues you feel are deserving of praise. This can be done anytime, anywhere, and can be anonymous.
  2. The Tribute Wall—Hang a large bulletin board in a conspicuous location. Colleagues are free to add notes which highlight what another colleague has contributed, specifying how she has been especially helpful to the author of the said note.
  3. Marvelous Mentor—After a new employee has begun, ask them who mentored them the most. Have them give a short speech to the mentor along with a lightbulb or candle representing how they lit up their way.

Matthew Koren unleashes the leadership potential in your people so teams can thrive. He is based out of Portland, OR. To learn more about his programs, click here. To receive great, useful content each month, sign up for his email list here. To discuss how Matt can support you, your organization, and teams, contact him today! 

From Portland to Shanghai

Gazebo in Yu Yuan

As I open my eyes to what’s possible since adopting our company’s mission to ‘create teams that thrive’, particularly in cross-cultural environments, I see the important integration of old Chinese traditions (Confuciunism, Utilitarianism, “For the greater good”, etc.) with Portland-style living (accountability, sustainability, social good).

I see that as I’ve become more integrated into the Asian community of Portland, I’m reminded of how deep traditions can go, and the power of tradition as it survives—even a transoceanic journey.

We can find similar elements of Chinese culture show up in Seattle or London as we would in Beijing or Shanghai. The ‘distance’ between these cities is decreasing. Portland will soon need to respond to this opportunity, and this is an exciting time to become a part of this expansion.

Portland is the West Coast’s fourth largest freight gateway for international trade. Will the deeply humanistic, family-oriented traditions of China translate to the needs of a modern regional trading hub?

The future is simple, though at times we perceive it as complicated. Community is something that is understood internationally. Thus, this is a magical time to harness the potential of global community for our internationalized future. Let’s get ready together!

Matthew Koren unleashes the leadership potential in your people so teams can thrive. He is based out of Portland, OR. To learn more about his programs, click here. To receive great, useful content each month, sign up for his email list here. To discuss how Matt can support you, your organization, and teams, contact him today!